Headphone Jacks

Musicians used to pile into recording studios for weeks to engineer the sound they had in their head into a medium that could be copied, sold, and profited from. Loads of expensive equipment was involved in making sure what they played was as close to original as the masters, then the vinyl, then the live show.

Every listening experience is different. Records will be different than live, and listening to a live concert in your car while on a road trip will be different than having it on in the background of your office while you work.

Albums cost a lot of money to generate a specific sound. Nowadays you have to wonder if they consider how most of the listening experience is reduced down to the ⅛ inch headphone jack at the end of a pair of questionable speakers?

Or as it seems to be - no jack, and a reliance on the same electronic transmission?

Analog mastering is reduced to cassettes, then CDs, then MP3s, and now the shared stream?

Does the experience translate as the artist meant it to? Once the check clears, I’m sure most of them don’t care.

I’ve seen coffee table books sold in Kindle Format. Large books heavy with photos and formatting reduced down to a screen. People watch Dunkirk on an iPad. Marketing campaigns get a world of design and consideration only for the end-user to give it a passing glance.

It hurts to spend a lot of time putting something into a format the world might not be ready to receive for a few generations.