Hardly Worth Liking

Hardly Worth Liking

I feel like most brands waste their time on the hunt for likes. Giving you something that you’ll like is a disservice to everyone.

I previously wrote about how every outdoor brand seems to live in the Golden Hour. I suppose a bunch of them live in workshops noted for their layers of wood grain and leather.

There’s a new outdoor brand every day, or a brand looking to capitalize on the rough and tumble aesthetic of the outdoors. I get it, it’s a sexy look and I’m very much attracted to it. However, when it's in a feed with hundreds of others of brands who have adopted the same look and style to their marketing, I’m not always certain of who I’m looking at or what I should be buying from them.

Most, it seems, don’t want me to do anything but look at the picture of their product in use and marvel at it. Here is a valuable product that they need to sell, and all they are asking for is a like.

I’m never entirely sure what most brands are trying to sell me, which feels like a pretty good indicator that they aren’t sure either. I follow a lot of outdoor brands because I want to know what they are doing and thinking and trying to accomplish. It feels like they just want me to like their stuff on Instagram, which I’m more than happy to do, even though I’m not entirely sure how that is a business model.

I might be out of line here. It seems like if you are in the business of selling stuff, then you shouldn’t be afraid to ask people to buy the thing you are selling.

Instagram was playing around with the idea of hiding certain metrics from audiences. Would you care as much about a brand if you had no idea how many likes their content received? Would brands change the way they created and distributed content if that metric was off the table?

Maybe the fastest way to getting people interested in the thing you’re doing is to not give them something worth liking?

The Golden Hour photos are easy to do and easy to like. They have worked well enough for some people, which means it is a template others have found worthwhile of copying. I doubt it drives action.

Don’t give them something to like; give them something to buy. Give your audience a way to buy into a product, an experience, a method, a way of life, a philosophy, a story.

Brands that push out content for the likes are just trying to remind the world they are still there, and it leaves me wondering why they even exist at all.

I’m writing more about content strategy in the age of over-saturation.

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